I'm a debatable gentleman and endurance sport activist living in Los Angeles. Here, we'll talk about the second of those two things...

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4/18 Lunch Date Check-In With Coach Miyagi
After swimming today, I took a drive out to Mt. San Antonio so that I could meet with one of my coaches. He wanted to talk about my approach and late entry into St. George 70.3. I mentioned a couple places around town we could grab a quick bite and he told me to meet him at the top of Mt. San Antonio east of Los Angeles - pictured above. Things have been a little stressful in our camp lately. I’ve recently been banned from communicating with Coach Mick for at least another 2 weeks. This is how our last conversation went last week, when I flew into Philadelphia for a surprise visit at his gym —
Me: So I’m starting to see my season come together with a race every month or so. It looks good. I’m excited, Do we need to talk about A & B races?
Mick: Talk about what? What did you say, Kid?
Me: There are races that people place more importance on than others, it’s really popular in the sport, and they—-
Mick: Are you telling me jokes, Kid? Is this a joke? You mean to tell me you people —
Me: No, no. Not me. I’ve never—
Mick: Don’t ever interrupt me, Kid!! You just asked me so I’m gonna tell you!! You mean to tell me people train and travel and spend their damn money to go to these dogfights telling themselves one means less than another?! That makes me sick, Kid! Sick! Don’t you ever, ever come around me talking like that again. If you ever think you can show up on a line, any line and not be ready to give me every damn thing you got, oh, you got another thing coming. The arrogance, Kid! The damn arrogance!! Who says you’re gonna be here tomorrow?! Tell me, what are we waiting’ for?!!! Now get outta here and don’t come back. I ain’t your coach no more…not til May. I don’t care if you came all this way I’m doin’ it for your own damn good! Get outta here!! Outta here!!
—-
Miyagi addressed my issues with Mick, but only sparingly. It’s just not his style to mediate, and we had other things to talk about. I parked at the San Antonio Falls at about 6,000 feet and started my trek to meet Miyagi around 11,000. He gave me an apple and sat me down. Last Saturday when we checked in, I told him I was heavy and tired from Oceanside and Galveston and that St. George was coming quickly. I thought he was going to scale things back this week, since he’s usually the finesse side of our equation. This was the voicemail he left for me Saturday night:
Miyagi: Reilly-san, tomorrow, this need be biggest run week you ever feel in life. Every time run, no feel like want run. Feel heart, no feel love. Keep pace low 7 minute and breathe. Feel body. Let body speak. Utah hot, Reilly-san. Utah big hill everywhere. Air thin. Body must be like strong rope. Must understand what feel like run 70 mile. Must learn respect before learn win. And when tired, no allow skip bike swim. No excuse.
—- 
It’s Friday and I’m at 60 miles. When I started last Sunday, I was too tired to go any longer than 10 on my long run day. So it’s been a long week. Lots of doubles. Very few of the 60 miles I’ve run have even felt, “okay.” But I trust these guys. I do. I feel like they’re lining me up for something big. 

4/18 Lunch Date Check-In With Coach Miyagi

After swimming today, I took a drive out to Mt. San Antonio so that I could meet with one of my coaches. He wanted to talk about my approach and late entry into St. George 70.3. I mentioned a couple places around town we could grab a quick bite and he told me to meet him at the top of Mt. San Antonio east of Los Angeles - pictured above. Things have been a little stressful in our camp lately. I’ve recently been banned from communicating with Coach Mick for at least another 2 weeks. This is how our last conversation went last week, when I flew into Philadelphia for a surprise visit at his gym —

Me: So I’m starting to see my season come together with a race every month or so. It looks good. I’m excited, Do we need to talk about A & B races?

Mick: Talk about what? What did you say, Kid?

Me: There are races that people place more importance on than others, it’s really popular in the sport, and they—-

Mick: Are you telling me jokes, Kid? Is this a joke? You mean to tell me you people —

Me: No, no. Not me. I’ve never—

Mick: Don’t ever interrupt me, Kid!! You just asked me so I’m gonna tell you!! You mean to tell me people train and travel and spend their damn money to go to these dogfights telling themselves one means less than another?! That makes me sick, Kid! Sick! Don’t you ever, ever come around me talking like that again. If you ever think you can show up on a line, any line and not be ready to give me every damn thing you got, oh, you got another thing coming. The arrogance, Kid! The damn arrogance!! Who says you’re gonna be here tomorrow?! Tell me, what are we waiting’ for?!!! Now get outta here and don’t come back. I ain’t your coach no more…not til May. I don’t care if you came all this way I’m doin’ it for your own damn good! Get outta here!! Outta here!!

—-

Miyagi addressed my issues with Mick, but only sparingly. It’s just not his style to mediate, and we had other things to talk about. I parked at the San Antonio Falls at about 6,000 feet and started my trek to meet Miyagi around 11,000. He gave me an apple and sat me down. Last Saturday when we checked in, I told him I was heavy and tired from Oceanside and Galveston and that St. George was coming quickly. I thought he was going to scale things back this week, since he’s usually the finesse side of our equation. This was the voicemail he left for me Saturday night:

Miyagi: Reilly-san, tomorrow, this need be biggest run week you ever feel in life. Every time run, no feel like want run. Feel heart, no feel love. Keep pace low 7 minute and breathe. Feel body. Let body speak. Utah hot, Reilly-san. Utah big hill everywhere. Air thin. Body must be like strong rope. Must understand what feel like run 70 mile. Must learn respect before learn win. And when tired, no allow skip bike swim. No excuse.

—- 

It’s Friday and I’m at 60 miles. When I started last Sunday, I was too tired to go any longer than 10 on my long run day. So it’s been a long week. Lots of doubles. Very few of the 60 miles I’ve run have even felt, “okay.” But I trust these guys. I do. I feel like they’re lining me up for something big. 

Galveston 70.3 - 4:00:53 AG #1 (Amateur Champion) OA #21

I received a great piece of advice last year when I was working with Matt Dixon with regards to doing a back to back 70.3. He told me to not be ready to race the second week until I was in the water waiting for the gun to go off. It gave me permission to feel like I had been hit by a train several times over the course of the prep week. And honestly, I even woke up race morning feeling dead, and flat, and SO tired. But when the gun went off, things started working.

No one knew until race morning if we were going to be allowed to swim. Then, we assumed rain was coming, and that winds would be wild and constantly shifting. They were. And there was rain. I’ve recently become bike numbers obsessed because that seems to be working for me. I wanted to go out holding 350 watts to the turnaround - sometimes I say ridiculous things — it’s a part of my process. I rode that in Oceanside for the first hour and thought it was going to be no problem. I haven’t looked at my computer file yet, but I was short of that by a bit. It’s tough on a fast flat when you have to eat. But I went out around 335 while working. I figured the ride back was going to be a slaughter, and I would fight dropping watts like in Oceanside, where I struggled to stay above 300 for the last 10 miles. Instead, I got into a nice working rhythm around 325-330. So if you asked me what happens to the body when you go back to back, I’d say the high end gets diluted…but the overall effort holds sustainable. I haven’t talked to coach Mick about this yet. We certainly have things to work on. But I did have the fastest bike split in the entire field with a 2:04, which sounds ridiculous, but I am also averaging about 40-50 watts higher average over 56 miles from last year, I’m lighter, and could take naps in aero on my new Shiv it’s so comfortable compared to 2013. Naps. Galveston is also dead flat - favorable for Godzillas of the racing world.

So yeah, it feels good to win an amateur title against a field like this. There were several big time amateur Vegas/Kona performers on the course. Very talented guys. That’s not a backhanded compliment to myself. I’m not sure I’m that talented. Truthfully, I still feel a bit like I am fooling everyone. But I’ve also got a bit of swag back because I’m racing my own races. I am holding my own reins. Swim smart, bike blitz, run patient. That’s my game for 2014, the game people will have to play against if they want to beat me…

Before I step up and start getting my ass kicked all over again. 

Galveston 70.3 Check w/ Coaches Mick & Miyagi

Mick: How you feeling kid? You tired, you bothered, say something.

Me: I feel like —

Mick: I don’t care how you feel can you get that through your thick skull!! You showed me a little something last weekend, but not much! I told ya, I told ya to ride like a damn freight train, straight until the wheels fell off. Then I told ya to run like a freight train, and boy did they ever. You looked like a damn mollusk out there coming home! You know what a damn mollusk is, kid? It’s a damn ugly thing, and damn slow, and I ain’t in this to work with no damn mollusks you hear me? I’m too damn old and too damn close to dead. 

Me: Okay.

Mick: What did you ride those first 24 miles in California?

Me: 346.

Mick: And I bet you think you’re something slick, dontcha?

Me: No. I —

Mick: Galveston is an out and back. I want 350 out, and I want you to show me your guts back. You’re gonna be bothered kid, and hurting, and I want you to hurt your hurt right back. Because if you fall below 340 on the day, I don’t wanna see your ugly mug around me no more!! Now get outta my face…and show me some heart, kid.  Show me some heart.

—————

Miyagi: Reilly san, run like fire. No run like fire. Run like fire. Stop try win race mile 1. If fire grow inside first 30 minute, no put out. If keep fire cool mile 6, then run like fire. Miyagi proud Reilly san for making mess no give up. But now use mind. No try win race mile 1.

Oceanside 70.3 - 4:17:34 AG #2 OA #22

Everyone has a plan in this game. My plan was to get control of my plan again. I lost some weight off season, picked up a new fitting bike, picked up a couple new coaches Mick and Miyagi, and picked up a dire need to get my race fulfillment back. I don’t like people telling me what to do. It doesn’t work with me. As much as that makes me sound brick-headed and tough to root for, I CAN NOT HELP THIS. IT IS WHO I AM. So this race, I heard every bit of brilliant advice from brilliant endurance minds and then disregarded it all. BECAUSE I CANNOT HELP IT. Everyone says to play it safe the first 24 miles of the bike course. Because hills are coming. And winds. And fatigue. To make certain I avoided every feeling that left me racing hollow last year, I made myself somewhat time trial the first 24 miles without regard for what it would do to the rest of my day. PowerTap says I rode the first 24 miles at a 354 watt average. Fell off a bit towards the end, but still finished 331 with a time of 2:19. Last year, my Vegas watts were 285 on a bike day I was fairly happy with. So…things are moving. 

The point of racing triathlon is to get from point A to B as fast as you can. Coaches Mick and Miyagi understood that from day 1, and have taken an individualized approach with me. They want me to ride hard, to always ride hard. It’s clearly my strength and gives me the best chance of getting from point A to B in the fastest time possible. On this day, my run struggled a bit. I hurt a ton on the back half after thinking I could keep the 6:12 paced first half, and probably because I somewhat nuked the bike. Yes, I know everyone hurts on the back half. But there’s an exponential difference between good hurt and damage control hurt. So how much slower on the run was I than last year’s conservative approach? 45 seconds. Last year I rode a 2:26. Why the run fall off? I probably need to train harder. Maybe it’s because my important nutrition bottle got kicked early on the bike and dried me out. Maybe because I told myself I could stay with Brent McMahon for WAY too long on the first lap of my run (his second). Maybe it just wasn’t my day. But I am not deluding myself when I say all of my training runs are happening 20 seconds per mile faster than last year. So something is in there. Maybe I’ll figure it out someday.

That was the most fun race I’ve had in a long time. And I didn’t nail it. Made several gaping mistakes out there. But they were mine, and when I went through this overhaul, I knew that was the most important piece to the puzzle. If we want to talk about burying the lead, this was also likely my best race. I’ve never raced well in Oceanside. This was solid. 

See you in Galveston…

Look Closely…
This is interesting. It’s a series of morning weights written on my wall from the middle of the 2013 season. They range anywhere from 200-210.4. Some of the more interesting ones - “205.4 to St G,” “208.2 to Honu,” “202.4 to Vineman,” “200.6 to Zurich.” I was a bigger boy, no doubt. In an effort to come at this season from a different angle, I set out to lose weight and see where it could get me. I started November 9th at 209 and eventually got down to 184 by the week of March 1st. I was always after losing weight, and could sometimes feel myself holding back calories to hit my goal.  Once I started seeing low to mid 180’s, it was time to move towards intensity and a feel for race pacing on my new-ish body. I stopped being as fearful of calories as training kicked up. It was necessary or my body refused to sleep. Sometimes, during certain stretches of the week, I eat constantly and through the night. Have to. So I stopped weighing in on thursdays. It’s been a few weeks. Today, I decided to step back on and found myself at 185.4. 
Oceanside is coming next week. That’s a big one. To be honest, I can’t and don’t want to see past it at all. I’ve been seeing it in my mind for a while now, what I want to do to the course, how I want to play it. There is always a great energy in the morning of the first real marker of a new season.
Yes, I’m a different weight, and it makes a difference. I’ll probably be 20 pounds lighter this year on the same course. But I’m not about to sit back and expect that to carry me. It won’t. Last year, all year, I sat back and expected guided, proven training to carry me and it didn’t. Because nothing carries you in this sport. Not ever. I like that. I love that at the end of the day, at the peak levels of whatever level you’re racing, the guy or girl who is willing to hurt the most in training and racing is usually the one that leaves town with what they came for. 

Look Closely…

This is interesting. It’s a series of morning weights written on my wall from the middle of the 2013 season. They range anywhere from 200-210.4. Some of the more interesting ones - “205.4 to St G,” “208.2 to Honu,” “202.4 to Vineman,” “200.6 to Zurich.” I was a bigger boy, no doubt. In an effort to come at this season from a different angle, I set out to lose weight and see where it could get me. I started November 9th at 209 and eventually got down to 184 by the week of March 1st. I was always after losing weight, and could sometimes feel myself holding back calories to hit my goal.  Once I started seeing low to mid 180’s, it was time to move towards intensity and a feel for race pacing on my new-ish body. I stopped being as fearful of calories as training kicked up. It was necessary or my body refused to sleep. Sometimes, during certain stretches of the week, I eat constantly and through the night. Have to. So I stopped weighing in on thursdays. It’s been a few weeks. Today, I decided to step back on and found myself at 185.4. 

Oceanside is coming next week. That’s a big one. To be honest, I can’t and don’t want to see past it at all. I’ve been seeing it in my mind for a while now, what I want to do to the course, how I want to play it. There is always a great energy in the morning of the first real marker of a new season.

Yes, I’m a different weight, and it makes a difference. I’ll probably be 20 pounds lighter this year on the same course. But I’m not about to sit back and expect that to carry me. It won’t. Last year, all year, I sat back and expected guided, proven training to carry me and it didn’t. Because nothing carries you in this sport. Not ever. I like that. I love that at the end of the day, at the peak levels of whatever level you’re racing, the guy or girl who is willing to hurt the most in training and racing is usually the one that leaves town with what they came for. 

Desert International Triathlon - 3rd Overall - 1:50:17

That’s one under the belt. Felt good to feel a race again. I don’t have a ton to say about this one because a big one is coming and I don’t want to divert that much energy away from diving into a ferocious last prep block. Desert Tri is a great, chill, LA/San Diego escapist race out in the Coachella Valley. Some pretty fast guys usually show up - this year there were rumors of Luke McKenzie and some mysterious pod of elite Russian ITU guys - very exciting and WTF — but none of that materialized. Still, there were a handful of gunners on the line. Made for a great day. 

The race — Swam okay considering it has been priority #3 so far this off-season. .75 in just under 17. Biked…okay. 24 miles in 56:23. Says I averaged 25.4 with 10 rough, narrow turns. I had the fastest split in the field…but still. To be honest, I expected to ride like a monster and didn’t. Not on THIS day. Ran a 5:42 pace for a low 34 minute 6 mile run. Looking back, I feel there was a touch to be desired there. I was close to SURE from training 5:30 pace was going to work…and it just didn’t. Not on THIS day. All of this is good, though. I was completely satisfied with how things went…and it makes me feel there’s a good chance I’m responsibly stalking my best performance, and that it’s not far away. Right now I’m hungry for 70.3 miles. It’s my best distance without hesitation.

Top pic courtesy of Gerardo Barrios of Fortius Coaching  - great guy who I’ve known for as long as I’ve been doing this. Second pic with male 2nd overall and Skechers Performance/Tower 26/Cynergy Cycles teammate Jim Lubinski - who ran past me on mile 3 and went on to the fastest run of the day at a 4:55 pace. Inspiring and back-breaking all at once. My bike is jumping and I only barely out split him. He’s going to have a great year. Last two from my buddy Tyler Olson, who was out on the course giving push all day. Much appreciated.

Great test on the new body. I’m hopeful. This course is dead flat everywhere, and was cool, so I couldn’t reap as many benefits as I will in the thick of the season. But I felt cooler all day, like my body was more accepting of the work I was putting it through. I can only imagine the importance of this growing as temps and terrain do as well.

The Caveman
This guy is Conrad Stoltz. He’s South African. He’s 6’4 and weighs 82 kilos or 183 pounds. He’s more of an off-road specialist (7x world champ in ITU off and XTERRA), but when he comes to races on flat roads, the guy tears holes in the cement, usually putting a gap on the fastest riders in the game. Two Septembers ago, at Rev 3 Maine, he averaged 405 watts over 52 minutes and out split the super, super fast Jesse Thomas by 80 seconds over 24 miles. Both ride bikes like heroes.
Last year, after taking a wrong turn in Abu Dhabi and with the staggered start times, I found myself riding in the second pro group for about 10 miles. They were on their third lap and heading home while I was on my second. Most of the 10 miles, I spent behind Conrad Stoltz. Their draining third lap and my rage for flying across the world only to miss a turn and lose 30 minutes put us on pretty equal footing at the time. I remember thinking, “Shhh…that’s The Caveman. Don’t let him know you’re here.” It was a highlight for me…watching them stretch out and whip back, trying to non-draft “hang on” for as long as I should.
The Caveman has been an inspiration to me lately. Not just because his name is The Caveman. After going through somewhat of a body transformation this winter, I’m within a kilo or two of his race weight. Same height. So finally, I’ve found a parallel to understand what it takes. I never set out to be a good age-group cyclist. That’s what frustrated me to no end last year - something was always off. There was always a voice telling me my times were sluggish. They were sluggish. There was no jump from 2012. I either hovered or regressed. People told me to give up on the jump. To be patient. That everyone plateaus. I didn’t buy any of that. Nothing was working and no one was listening. My season on the bike was an absolute, awful mess. 
So I’ve lost 10 kilos. What else? After my injury and after going through PT, I started going to a tough, tough hot core-barre taught by the tough, tough Katie Ryan 2-3 times a week to blister and burden and revolutionize all of my secondary leg/glute/back/core muscles that had gone on hiatus. I went out and hired the two coaches Mick and Miyagi to keep me in line and freshen perspective. I joined the LA track club and went back to my more authentic, ballistic self. Oh, and I realized the L Shiv TT I was riding was too small for me after testing a Shiv XL…and that the speed wobble I got on sharp descents of EVERY race as a likely result of cramming onto a dope as shit but too small bike wasn’t my fault. Neither was my acquired fear of descending. The last piece to the puzzle was that a 2013 XL S-Works Shiv came in for me and I was finally able to get back to my PowerTap numbers. The PowerTap technology is constantly driving me, and also now allowing this coming revelation.
On Saturday, I went for one of my favorite longer rides. Just under 5 hours depending on a stop or two. It’s a solid 2 hour build up to Oxnard, pushing hills on the way out to berry field flats where someone can do consistent 10 minute intervals. Last year, it was hotter, but I remember a day…and a set of 3x10. I remember holding 309, then something like 294, then 285. I remember thinking that was solid for the day, that if I lost a little more weight and raised my w/kg, I would be doing okay. I remember being satisfied with the workout…
For the sake of not sounding delusional or liar-esque or overly projectile, let’s just say these were actually 20 minute intervals I did last year (I suppose there was a very small chance they could have been). Then we can project my sustained watts over those (actual) 10 minute intervals would have been a rough, respectable 325, 318, 315. On Saturday, with everything I’ve put into this winter so far, my 3x10 went 387, 380, 378. When I was almost home, 4+ hours into my ride, I fit in 6 minutes at 394. Things are different. 
2 weeks into Mick’s “Okay You Lost The Weight, Now You Gotta Get Damn Fast” program, he has showed me it is not too much, NEVER too much to set your bar as high as it can possibly go. He put me down in a chair, slapped my face and said, “Ten less kilos, sixty more watts you damn mutt! You wanna listen to me now?!?” Then he kissed my face. Then, “Okay kid, now go wash my laundry.” 

The Caveman

This guy is Conrad Stoltz. He’s South African. He’s 6’4 and weighs 82 kilos or 183 pounds. He’s more of an off-road specialist (7x world champ in ITU off and XTERRA), but when he comes to races on flat roads, the guy tears holes in the cement, usually putting a gap on the fastest riders in the game. Two Septembers ago, at Rev 3 Maine, he averaged 405 watts over 52 minutes and out split the super, super fast Jesse Thomas by 80 seconds over 24 miles. Both ride bikes like heroes.

Last year, after taking a wrong turn in Abu Dhabi and with the staggered start times, I found myself riding in the second pro group for about 10 miles. They were on their third lap and heading home while I was on my second. Most of the 10 miles, I spent behind Conrad Stoltz. Their draining third lap and my rage for flying across the world only to miss a turn and lose 30 minutes put us on pretty equal footing at the time. I remember thinking, “Shhh…that’s The Caveman. Don’t let him know you’re here.” It was a highlight for me…watching them stretch out and whip back, trying to non-draft “hang on” for as long as I should.

The Caveman has been an inspiration to me lately. Not just because his name is The Caveman. After going through somewhat of a body transformation this winter, I’m within a kilo or two of his race weight. Same height. So finally, I’ve found a parallel to understand what it takes. I never set out to be a good age-group cyclist. That’s what frustrated me to no end last year - something was always off. There was always a voice telling me my times were sluggish. They were sluggish. There was no jump from 2012. I either hovered or regressed. People told me to give up on the jump. To be patient. That everyone plateaus. I didn’t buy any of that. Nothing was working and no one was listening. My season on the bike was an absolute, awful mess. 

So I’ve lost 10 kilos. What else? After my injury and after going through PT, I started going to a tough, tough hot core-barre taught by the tough, tough Katie Ryan 2-3 times a week to blister and burden and revolutionize all of my secondary leg/glute/back/core muscles that had gone on hiatus. I went out and hired the two coaches Mick and Miyagi to keep me in line and freshen perspective. I joined the LA track club and went back to my more authentic, ballistic self. Oh, and I realized the L Shiv TT I was riding was too small for me after testing a Shiv XL…and that the speed wobble I got on sharp descents of EVERY race as a likely result of cramming onto a dope as shit but too small bike wasn’t my fault. Neither was my acquired fear of descending. The last piece to the puzzle was that a 2013 XL S-Works Shiv came in for me and I was finally able to get back to my PowerTap numbers. The PowerTap technology is constantly driving me, and also now allowing this coming revelation.

On Saturday, I went for one of my favorite longer rides. Just under 5 hours depending on a stop or two. It’s a solid 2 hour build up to Oxnard, pushing hills on the way out to berry field flats where someone can do consistent 10 minute intervals. Last year, it was hotter, but I remember a day…and a set of 3x10. I remember holding 309, then something like 294, then 285. I remember thinking that was solid for the day, that if I lost a little more weight and raised my w/kg, I would be doing okay. I remember being satisfied with the workout…

For the sake of not sounding delusional or liar-esque or overly projectile, let’s just say these were actually 20 minute intervals I did last year (I suppose there was a very small chance they could have been). Then we can project my sustained watts over those (actual) 10 minute intervals would have been a rough, respectable 325, 318, 315. On Saturday, with everything I’ve put into this winter so far, my 3x10 went 387, 380, 378. When I was almost home, 4+ hours into my ride, I fit in 6 minutes at 394. Things are different. 

2 weeks into Mick’s “Okay You Lost The Weight, Now You Gotta Get Damn Fast” program, he has showed me it is not too much, NEVER too much to set your bar as high as it can possibly go. He put me down in a chair, slapped my face and said, “Ten less kilos, sixty more watts you damn mutt! You wanna listen to me now?!?” Then he kissed my face. Then, “Okay kid, now go wash my laundry.” 

Best Of The Week Playlist - 2/17 - Revolution & Equinox Santa Monica
Aerosmith - Dream On
David Bowie - Space Oddity
Guns N’ Roses - Paradise City
Michael Jackson - They Don’t Care About Us
Eminem & Kendrick Lamar - Love Game
The Rolling Stones - Paint It, Black
No Doubt - Push and Shove
Radiohead - Nude
Naughty By Nature - O.P.P.
Muse - New Born
Pink Floyd - Brain Damage 
Pink Floyd - Eclipse
Kendrick Lamar & Jay-Z - Bitch, Don’t Kill My Vibe remix
Muse - Madness
M83 - Where the Boats Go
MGMT - Alien Days
Imagine Dragons & Kendrick Lamar - Radioactive remix
Earl Sweatshirt - Chum
Vampire Weekend - Step
Lil Wayne & Jay Z - Mr. Carter
Danny Brown & A$AP Rocky - Kush Coma
Sting - Russians
Daft Punk & Paul Williams - Touch
Ben E. King - Stand By Me
Red Hot Chili Peppers - Higher Ground
Sigur Ros - Festival
Beyonce - Partition
Peter Gabriel - Sledgehammer
U2 - With Or Without You
Beyonce & Frank Ocean - Superpower
Puff Daddy & Notorious B.I.G. - Victory
Explosions In The Sky - Six Days At The Bottom Of The Ocean
Journey - Faithfully
The Ronettes - Be My Baby
Simon & Garfunkel - The Boxer
The Killers - Leave The Bourbon On The Shelf
T. Rex - Cosmic Dancer

Best Of The Week Playlist - 2/17 - Revolution & Equinox Santa Monica

Aerosmith - Dream On

David Bowie - Space Oddity

Guns N’ Roses - Paradise City

Michael Jackson - They Don’t Care About Us

Eminem & Kendrick Lamar - Love Game

The Rolling Stones - Paint It, Black

No Doubt - Push and Shove

Radiohead - Nude

Naughty By Nature - O.P.P.

Muse - New Born

Pink Floyd - Brain Damage 

Pink Floyd - Eclipse

Kendrick Lamar & Jay-Z - Bitch, Don’t Kill My Vibe remix

Muse - Madness

M83 - Where the Boats Go

MGMT - Alien Days

Imagine Dragons & Kendrick Lamar - Radioactive remix

Earl Sweatshirt - Chum

Vampire Weekend - Step

Lil Wayne & Jay Z - Mr. Carter

Danny Brown & A$AP Rocky - Kush Coma

Sting - Russians

Daft Punk & Paul Williams - Touch

Ben E. King - Stand By Me

Red Hot Chili Peppers - Higher Ground

Sigur Ros - Festival

Beyonce - Partition

Peter Gabriel - Sledgehammer

U2 - With Or Without You

Beyonce & Frank Ocean - Superpower

Puff Daddy & Notorious B.I.G. - Victory

Explosions In The Sky - Six Days At The Bottom Of The Ocean

Journey - Faithfully

The Ronettes - Be My Baby

Simon & Garfunkel - The Boxer

The Killers - Leave The Bourbon On The Shelf

T. Rex - Cosmic Dancer